New OECD report on “The future of news and the Internet”

The death of the newspaper is greatly exaggerated — generally speaking from the point of view of the OECD. Aside from in the U.S., the decline in revenues is on par with the general financial decline in recent years.

Figure 1. Estimated newspaper publishing market decline in OECD countries, 2007-2009 (in per cent)

…[A] new OECD report looking at “The Future of News and the Internet”. It contains new data and analysis on the global newspaper industry and the challenges presented by the Internet. Its main message is that “large country-by-country and title-by-title differences and the data currently do not lend themselves to make the case for “the death of the newspaper”, in particular if non-OECD countries and potential positive effects of the economic recovery are taken into account.” The full report, including data and charts, is available at,3343,en_2649_34223_45449136_1_1_1_1,00.html

After very profitable years, newspaper publishers in most OECD countries face declining advertising revenues, titles and circulation. The economic crisis has amplified this downward development.

About 20 out of 30 OECD countries face declining newspaper readership, with significant decreases in some OECD countries. Newspaper readership is usually lower among younger people who tend to attribute less importance to print media. In OECD countries, the general, regional and local press have been hardest hit and 2009 was expected to be the worst year for OECD newspapers, with the largest declines in the United States, the United Kingdom, Greece, Italy, Canada, and Spain (but much a much smaller impact on countries such as Austria, Australia (See above).

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U.S. Broadband Still Lagging: 2009 Report on Internet Speeds in All 50 States

A bit ironic that the latest – third annual – report from the Communication Workers of America Union is a whopping 20 megabites (could take an hour to download via a dialup connection). I’ve embedded the full PDF at the bottom of this post.

U.S. connection speeds have not improved significantly in the past year, according to the Union’s press release. The results of nearly 413,000 real-time Internet connection speed tests (conducted using widgets exactly like the one below) show that the United States continues to lag behind other countries for average upload and download speeds.

The average download speed of U.S. Internet connections is 5.1 megabits per second, significantly below the averages of countries like South Korea (20.1 mbps), Japan (16 mbps) and Sweden (12.7 mbps).

See my other blog posts on this issue here.

What speed are you getting? Is upload speed anywhere near download speed?

2009 Report on Internet Speeds in All 50 States