Is the Miers nomination the beginning of the end for Bush’s coalition?

In the Sunday New York Times, Frank Rich says, “The Miers nomination, whatever its fate, will be remembered as the flashpoint when the faith-based Bush base finally started to lose faith in our propaganda president and join the apostate American majority.” Click here to read this if you’re not a Times subscriber.

Robert Novak mentions as in aside in his “Hurricane Harriet” article, that, in securing the support of 80 or so senators prior to announcing the Miers nomination, Bush gave the impression that his candidate would be federal Circuit Judge Consuelo Callahan of California!

The Conservative Voice labels Bush a liar and in the same breath Pat Buchanan evokes JFK in questioning Bush’s logic in the nomination.

E. J. Dionne of the Washington Post examines the issue of religion and why it is such an important factor to conservatives throughout the government. He uses examples such as Focus on the Family’s James Dobson, who declared that he wasn’t sure about Miers’ positions, but “I know the individual who led her to the Lord.”
Ann Coulter
OK, so Miers may be the smartest person George W. Bush has ever met, but even Ann Coulter says in a Sunday editorial “Mr. Bush has no right to say ‘Trust me,'” insisting that he would have been better off nominating his dog, Barney.

The sentiment throughout the Sunday Week in Review section of the NY Times seems to be that the Miers nomination “threatens to shatter” the Rove-designed Bush coalition.

Marvin and Peter Olasky, in a midweek editorial in the LA Times, later reprinted in other newspapers echo the sentiments of David Frum, a former Bush speechwriter, who said after Miers’ nomination: “The pressures on a Supreme Court justice to shift leftward are intense.” Will Miers uphold Bush’s promise that “Harriet will not change.”

And finally, ConservativeHQ.com issued a poll of 83 conservative leaders and 83 percent of them said that Bush does not govern as a conservative should.

President Bush said What?!?!?

Plenty of discussion continues today regarding the President’s one-hour press conference yesterday.

Many are hung up on his idea that the military will move in and secure things martially in the event of an avian flu outbreak. While Bush mentioned – and highly recommended – “Mr. Barry’s book on the influenza outbreak of 1918,” we must assume that, as per usual, Rumsfeld will want complete control over any plan (or lack thereof) to combat avian flu ? hence the reference to the military.

Bush remains insistent on the “progress” in Iraq, invoking the convenient “let me remind you that we are at war” phrase in his address – proving for certain that he doesn’t read the papers. His claim that 30 Iraqi troops are now in the lead (in defense of General Abizaid and General Casey’s claims that only one Iraqi batallion is battle-ready) only infers that they’re helpless pawns on the frontlines of stronger U.S. forces – probably the reason Iraqi troops face twice the amount of casualties as Americans. At least he’s conceding his Social Security reform plans, or so writes DailyKoz.

As for the Harriett “pit bull” Miers announcement, nobody says it quite like George Will in today’s WaPo.

On the gov’t deliberate process of removing and clearing damage caused by the hurricanes:

BUSH: How about getting this debris removed?? Now that you’re interested, I’ll tell you.

They didn’t want to be moving federally paid dozers on private property. Imagine cleaning up a debris and the person shows them, says, “Where’s my valuable china?” or, “Where’s my valuable art?”

DeLay, Frist, Plame, Myers, Katrina, Iraq: is this the Denouement of the Republican Party?

The October 10 issue of The Weekly Standard is titled “Scandal Season.” It promises to be a remorseful introspection of the current state of the republican administration its bottomless pit of scandals.

William Kristol, editor of the Weekly Standard – a pointedly Conservative rag – is quoted in The Australian: “Even though DeLay has nothing to do with Frist and Frist has nothing to do with Abramoff, how does it look? Not good.”

Weekly Standard staff editor Matthew Continetti notes with pride that the Republican’s have once again bested the Dems, although as a young conservative, he admits: “looking at your party’s troubles, you see perverse confirmation of conservatism’s animating idea: that as the sphere of public decision-making expands, so do the opportunities for graft and wrongdoing.” Daily Kos has great insight on this.
Patrick J. Buchanan, in the National Conservative Weekly, evoked the words of Claudius in getting a handle on the disintegration within the Republican Party: “When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions.”

Frank Rich contends that conservative chronies have been flipping on their party for months now and many are tired of sleazy scandals. He points to conservative columnist Andrew Ferguson of The Weekly Standard, who announced the beginning of the end of the Republican Party as we know it in an article he wrote on Jack Abramoff nearly a year ago.

there is MUCH MORE to this story… click to read on.
Down with Tommy D

Hurricane Katrina and Anti-Americanism; Listen to Nancy Pelosi!

According to Media Matters for America, the media has ignored and largely misrepresented Nancy Pelosi’s accusations against FEMA and the Bush administration broadcast on the September 7 CBS Evening News:
PELOSI: When I said to the president that he should fire Michael Brown, he said, “Why would I do that?” I said, “Because of all that went wrong, with all that didn’t go right last week.” And he said, “What didn’t go right?” Oblivious, in denial, dangerous.

Pelosi (D-CA) pegged Michael Brown of FEMA, formerly a judge in horse shows as incompetent in the Sept. 6San Francisco Chronicle.

Nicholas D. Kristoff writes in the Sept. 6 International Herald-Tribune:
“It’s not just that funds may have gone to Iraq rather than to the levees in New Orleans; it’s also that money went to tax cuts for the wealthiest rather than vaccinations for children.”

Roger Cohen writes “You can count the American image as a major casualty of Hurricane Katrina” in the International Herald-Tribune.

Julia Gronnevet discovers how the world is reporting Hurricane Katrina in the American Prospect.

Mark Steyn levels anti-Americanism in the fact of mother nature in his September 7 editorial in the Washington Times, “Sniping and Griping.”

Harold Meyerson labels the administration with the Rumsfeldism “Stuff Happens” Rumsfeldism

Jim Hoagland helps define anti-Bushism as being separate from anti-Americanism in the Sept. 7 Washington Post. “Katrina could yet hold a political silver lining if the disaster reminds both Bush and his harshest critics that America’s role in the world is not defined just by the personalities and policies of the current occupants of the White House.”

Murdoch’s New York Post blasts FEMA in two places today.

Finally, the Polls:

Bush: Disaster
Zogby today came out with a poll insinuating that the public would rather have Jimmy Carter in office right now. The bottom line is Bush gets 41% approval rating.

According to Gallup, 42% thought Bush’s response was terrible, yet 35% thought that it was good or great.

In CNN/USA Today‘s poll, 56% of the respondents felt New Orleans was devastated beyond repair (though 63% think it should be rebuilt), and nearly all thought it was the worst natural disaster to occur in the United States in their lifetime.