Under the Radar Saturday

Several interesting stories being filed today.

AP: A U.S. contractor was found mysteriously dead, sickness his laptop stolen, and Ahmed Chalabi mentioned among others in the article. Dale Stoffel apparently complained — a big no-no.

AFP: U.S. General John Abizaid states that forces have been cut by up to 20 percent in teh past couple months.

AP: The four members of the Christian Peacemaker Team, who have been kidnapped in IRaq for for over two months, appeared once again on Al-Jazeera, pleaing for their release. The group said it was their “last chance” for freedom from their captors, from the previously unknown Swords of Righteousness Brigade.

Reuters: A Sunni academic who condemned the presence of U.S. troops in Iraq and was often a commentator on both Al Jazeera and Al Arabiya television was killed today.

Serious action is finally being taken today to push for a filibuster blocking the nomination of Samuel Alito. A filibuster would require 41 votes from senate and there are 44 democrats. Grab a hold of the activism protruding from the left blogosphere here, here, here, and here.

MediaChannel’s Keep the light on Petition

Media Channel, the self-annointed Global Network for Democratic Media, has issued a petition calling for the media to continue reporting on Katrina and the injustices occuring throughout the government.

The KEEP THE LIGHT ON! petition is available to be signed by all. Lets not forget about nabbing Rove and/or Novak for keeping Judy Miller imprisoned and doing dirty laundry.

Is the Media being critical enough?

Scott McLellan today suggested that the buck stops with President Bush, inferring that he is to be held responsible for what “went wrong and what went right.” Additionally, Gen Richard Myers suggested that most papers on Tuesday said something to the extent of “New Orleans dodged a bullet,” when in fact, many blogs prove otherwise, as can be seen on the plethora of front pages crying, “devastation… catastrophe, etc” at Newseum

Its easy for bloggers and anyone in the media to point out these inaccuracies, but how can we effectively criticize without partaking in a silly blame game?

The Katrina issue revolves primarily around race and how the federal government chooses to be ignorant of those who are poor. Its not a black / white thing, its a rich/poor thing. Right Barbara Bush? Right, 14-year old Jamaican observer?
Several musings over the weekend regarding the media’s general outrage and uprising in the face of bureaucratic ignorance and indifference. Howard Kurtz writes in the Washington Post that “Journalism seems to have recovered its reason for being.”

From situations worsening…. to outrage at the response… The New York Times on the pendulum of reporting the disaster.

Still, Ariana Huffington begs the Times to “stop enabling the White House Blame game!

Steve Zunes, of “Foreign Policy in Focus,” hopes to read more criticism tying the Katrina response to the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

Christopher Hitchens thinks otherwise in Slate.

Stories in America is with me when I wonder: Shouldn’t other members of the media be advocating the impact poverty and race has had on the Katrina situation? Oprah exposes quite a bit of what is really happening her show. catch the video.