Bring Me the Head of…

Greg Palast, bestselling author and union/consumer rights advocate, is wanted by the Department of Homeland Security for exposing critical infrastructure in the filming of an unauthorized one-year-after-Katrina documentary.

The kicker is that — surprise, surprise:

the Bush Terror Terriers have kindly indicated on the Internet that this unprotected critical infrastructure can be targeted — I mean located — at 30 29? 11? N Latitude and 91 11? 39? W Longitude.

As if the president didn’t repeat himself enough last night, here’s one more reason why “The safety of America depends on the outcome of the battle in the streets of Baghdad New Orleans…”

Palast’s documentary itself apparently exposes that, while he may be a wanted man, tens of thousands are being held hostage “in this aluminum ghetto in the middle of nowhere….”

Palast is reknown not only for his excellent writing and activism, he has been in the Bush doghouse for quite a while. He previously exposed the Bush Administration for letting Exxon off easy by only charging for punitive damages as a result of the Valdez disaster. Before that, he “busted” ChoicePoint, the government’s chosen credit and ID-verification service, for voiding votes in the 2000 presidential election by falsifying criminal records of select Florida voters.

ANTI-social networking sites

TechCrunch points to two much-needed services in the over-congested world of online-networking:

Isolatr isn’t a real service, but it should be. Sean Bonner of Metroblogging created the site, which promises to “help you find where other people aren’t”. For bonus content, check out the FAQs (every answer is “no”). I love the attention to detail, like calling it a beta service, leaving the “e” out of the name and adding fake quotes from Doc Searls and Xeni Jardin.

Chris Pirillo has been asking for something like this (but real) for ages. Valleywag has more.

Bryant Choung’s Snubster is an actual, live service. It helps you notify people, and the world, that you are pissed off at someone. The “On Notice” feature tells them that they have committed an “infraction” and are in a suspension period. If they really screw up, you can state that they are “Dead to Me”. Each user has a profile (example) where they can get into the juicy details. The only question I have is, why is there an “e” before the “r” in the snubster name?

Add to this list, Memeorandum‘s just-launched gossip-tracking buzzblog WeSmirch.

Bloggers Campaign to Free Jill Carroll

Curt Hopkins, founding director of the Committee to Protect Bloggers, passed me a note as part of a call-to-blogs to help free Jill Carroll by disseminating a video PSA plea for her safe release.

The video is here (Arabic). Translation is here.

It shouldn’t be necessary to remind readers of this blog that 28-year-old Christian Science Monitor journalist Jill Carroll was kidnapped January 7.

A late February deadline set by her captors passed quietly and there has been no confirmation of her whereabouts or well-being, although optimism remains strong. The Christian Science Monitor announced last week that it has “reinvigorated its Iraqi media campaign” to free Carroll.

[technorati tag: blogjill]