Blogosphemers

I always think articles like the one in today’s Wall Street Journal are a kind of jinx. Can Bloggers Make Money?

The old guard says no way, new guard says why not. Some interesting opinions to peruse, but overall, isn’t it a jinx to go about your business thinking only of the green potential?

Of more interest, the ever-optimistic web innovator and Technorati founder David Sifry has released Part One of this month’s State of the Blogosphere report. “The blogosphere is doubling in size every 6 months,” is just one of the findings in his research.

Possibly the most useful item floating through the Blogosphere this week (aside from, on a local level, the 225 things to do in L.A. meme – in celebration of the city’s 225th anniversary) is Buzz Machine’s Jeff Jarvis publishing this questionniare, given to any freelancer who intends to write for the New York Times.

Jarvis “suggest[s] that bloggers should answer the questions as well and post them online to pressure mainstream journalists into such open disclosure.”

He answers the questions on his disclosures page, and Vaughn Ververs at Public Eye responds, as does Regret the Error.

Post: Iraqi Reporter Killed in Controversial ‘Mosque’ Raid

Kamal Manahi AnbarA 28-year-old reporter, enrolled in the London-based Institute for War and Peace Reporting was one of the casualities of the March 26th raid by Iraqi and U.S. troops that killed at least 16.

“All that he was carrying was a notebook,” a friend of the victim, Kamal Manahi Anbar, told the Washington Post.

The Pentagon reported that insurgents were killed and captured in the raid and U.S. military photos show several armed victims, while al-Iraqiya television aired photographs of unarmed civilians slain at a mosque.

Jonathan Finer and Naseer Nouri’s report on A12 of Saturday’s Post is the most complete account of the raid and is a necessary follow-up read for everyone who, like myself, was utterly confused by the conflicting reports of the attack.

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Also of note in the much-ignored Saturday papers, is this article in the Los Angeles Times by H.G. Reza. The story sucks you in the moment you read this deck:

The airport worker enjoyed Hollywood’s club scene. His hand was found chained to the steering wheel in Iraq’s deadliest attack.

Meanwhile… in Afghanistan

Several dozen Taliban were reportedly killed on Friday by Afghan and U.S. troops. Seeing as this hasn’t become a news item yet in the States begs the question… exactly HOW MANY Taliban are on the loose if death to 40-some isn’t newsworthy?

From the Beeb:

Some 41 Taleban fighters and six policemen have been killed in a battle in southern Afghanistan, a governor in the region has said.

OK, now I see it here on the Reuters wire, but as has been obvious for months, and has seen coverage of its own this week, is the absence of Afghanistan reporting in the U.S. press.

L.A. Times staff writer Paul Watson, based in Afghanistan, broke a huge story Monday, reporting that “memory sticks” or “flash drives” containing sensitive information are for sale at flea markets “no more than 200 yards from a U.S. base.” NBC confirmed the story, but not until Thursday, and on Saturday AP is picking it up.

We know that the security situation in Iraq precludes on the ground coverage from most media outlets. Is it the same in Afghanistan?

It seems Iraq only gets worse… we’re left hoping that Afghanistan will only get better, but, as E&P and others cry out: where da media at?