Independent: kids, porn & Guantanamo

Some of the best reporting in recent years has appeared in the Sunday pages on the mothership isle on the other side of the Atlantic.

The Independent (on Sunday) takes aim and fires away with “The children of Guantanamo.” A true story purporting to “reveal” that “60 of the detainees of the US camp were under 18 at the time of their capture, some as young as 14.”

Seems like a lead story to me, but really, in context — the cover of this “IoS” is clearly covered with porn! (Even the Nuge made the cover)!

otoh, front page images or not, Sarah Baxter has had a hand in several hq reports as the Sunday Times‘ D.C. – scribe, including today’s column “Revealed: how US marines massacred 24.”


Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad GOOG?

Hard to disagree with Google CEO Eric Schmidt, who publicly takes the Yahoo-Ebay partnership in stride. “Its good for everybody on the Internet,” he said, according to eWeek.

Google’s stock still sits pretty, with a 1999-style inflated valuation but with a solid and admirably successful business plan.

The eBay/Yahoo “strategic partnership” is indeed a glowing green light for the internet boom survivors, and it means alot more than say, Google recent investment in 5% of AOL (TWX). eBay needs help with advertising to keep their listing prices from rising (as they have been) and Yahoo! gets to co-brand Skype and Paypal. Add that to Yahoo!’s stable of sky’s-the-limit goodies such as del.icio.us, Flickr, and upcoming, to mention a few outright purchases.

Both companies will reap the benefits of added page views (Yahoo is already #1 and eBay #9, according to Alexa). As the big papers are saying — its a sign of fear or its look out Ma Goog. (see also, Barry’s post @ Content Matters).

Rafat @ Paid Content sums it up from the market analysts perspective. Search Engine Lowdown sums up the tech value. Battelle calls it “Yahoo’s first major syndication win in years.”

kill your television

40 percent of U.S. consumers would rather give up TV than the Internet, according to a new study of Internet and new media usage by Arbitron and Edison Media Research.

Spring may be here, but according to Jeff Jarvis: “The Book is Dead.” Warren Buffet says newspapers are perpetually dying.

Hard to agree with Buffet there, but he tends to always be right in the end. Who needs TV anyway, with so many stations worldwide available on the internet. Check them out via Beeline TV or MediaHopper.

via SeattlePI‘s grab from PaidContent.

See also: .

Homage l’Colbert

When the Huffington Post launched their “Contagious Festival,” soon after they partnered with AOL and Yahoo! months ago, it seemed as if it was a festival with an “end,” and a “winner.”

Now that I think back, some dude w/ a well-earned shit-eating grin did score something like a dinner with Arianna H. and JC.

But the stuff being published there recently has been phenomenal.

See this animated tribute to Stephen Colbert (an homage to his tiz-oasting of the prezididn’t)

and the ever-catchy — it’s a Top 40 hit in Japan — “I’m the Decider”

and its about time we get to see Judy Miller’s MySpace profile.

Go on and join the over 50,000 folks who have personally thanked Monsieur Colbert for setting things straight in his speech at the W.H. correspondents dinner last weekend. None of the newspaperpeople seemed to care much for it, save for Froomkin (2-time).

Beware the effet d’Colbert. (Here is a link to 15 mins of the famous speech)

It’s Always ‘Chaos’ in Basra – UPDATED

Basra British TroopsUpdated to examine progress of varying reports
While we’ve grown accustomed to daily reports of suicide bombings in and around Baghdad, some of the most dramatic anti-coalition action over the past 8 months has come out of Basra. Or at least the pristine video footage has it that way.

I’ve been restraining myself all morning from posting this CNN video report in which “rock-throwing, chanting crowds gather after a British copter crashes in Basra.”

The CNN anchor alludes to a Reuters report that the helicopter was shot down, but the reporter in Baghdad sort of sloughs it off. This account will most certainly change by days end. For now AP files it as follows (note – article at link will automatically be updated throughout the day):

Police Capt. Mushtaq Khazim said the helicopter was apparently shot down in a residential district. He said the four-member crew was killed, but British officials would say only that there were “casualties.”

basra
Agence-France Presse accounts for four dead including two children as a result of the “clashes between an angry mob and British troops at the site of the crash.”

UPDATE 1: I posted it, with additional reference to the 10 U.S. troops killed in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan. News outlets are featuring the stories differently, at least online. While both are top stories, in some instances the U.S. troops are featured. The Basra story is more important however because a) their helicopter may have been *shot* down, and b) according to CNN, Basra is once again under curfew. The Afghanistan incident did not involve enemy fire and also occurred over 24 hours ago. Sabrina Tavernise has filed from Baghdad for NYT.

UPDATE 2: AP has finally updated their wire writethrough. Here is the original, which clearly has a pro-U.S./British bias. The new article, by a different reporter, reads: “A British military helicopter apparently was hit by a missile” in the lede. Reuters, originally reported that the chopper was “apparently shot down,” and have since cut the “apparently” and say it was “brought down.”

Taking a completely different approach originally was AFP, who originally led with details of the clash on the ground and the Iraqi casualties. The French press agency has now flipped the lede to open with “At least two British soldiers died when their helicopter crashed…”

The photos coming off the wires are quite impressive.

While this may not seem at all interesting to anyone who may happen upon this blog, I find it highly interesting and educational. In these hi-tech fully-connected times, war reporting remains a varied, slow developing and highly objective art.