HuffPo Gets DIGGy With It

The Huffington Post opened its social bookmarking community site HuffIt today. Similar to Digg, HuffIt is a great concept that enables the (progressive-leaning) Huffington Post readership to aggregate and posts of interest from around the Web and recommend them to the community. Still VERY new — and potentially a little too 2.0 for most HuffPo readers to grasp at first — the most “Huffed” articles still have less than ten total “huffs.”

Very interesting to see such a prominent blog and news site take this approach. It will be interesting to see if any newspapers or other dominant webzines like Slate and Salon take a similar — or alternatively community-building — approach.

On the turning away suggests
that we’re approaching the point where Journalism 2.0 emerges as perpetuated by the Long Tail:

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Nat’l Conference for Media Reform w/ Bill Moyers Video

More than 3,000 people came together for NCMR2007 in Memphis this weekend and though I wasn’t able to attend, I would like to channel the messages and motivation expressed at the conference. The Free Press Action Center, which organized the event, is hosting some video and audio of all sessions on its conference page. More on the conference blog

Additionally, they’ve released calls for action regarding stopping big media, saving the internet, and promoting media reform and justice.

Part two of the above video of Bill Moyers‘ opening plenary is available here.

More from Nieman Watchdog, BuzzMachine, Memphis Commercial Appeal, SavetheInternet. Photos here and here.

Mark at News Corpse provided a brief summary:

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Is MySpace the Teenage Parking Lot of Today?

myspace photo by dogface from flickrGone are the days of cruising the streets with friends and rendezvousing at midnight at the Dunkin’ Donuts parking lot to see what’s up.

55% of online teens use social networks and have created online profiles. Girls moreso than boys (70% of girls aged 15-17), according to the results of a Pew Internet & American Life Project poll released this week (summary | full report [.pdf]).

As today’s high school students grow up in an age where everything that pops is born and manifests online, the results of the study indicate a teenage culture where friends are made and maintained via MySpace (85%), Facebook (7%) and the like. But increased caution is being practiced (if it’s not forced by parents or the generally tasteless spam friend requests from MySpace) — nearly 60% of the 12-17-year-olds surveyed restrict the visibility of their profiles to friends only.

Also of note, no big discrepancies between teenaged social network users based on race or differences in household income. But only 17% admit to having ever used these sites for “flirting,” however that’s defined.

photo by dogseat via flickr.