DJ Bobby D

Bob SimpsonYou heard about it earlier in the year — and now, the Observer UK has capitalized on an exclusive preview of Bob Dylan’s first DJ set for XMradio. This article gives the complete rundown, including the playlist. A second article adds even more — hello American media, Bob Dylan DJ-ing is worth at least ONE column, right? Get over the David Lee Roth / Howard Stern muck-fest.

The articles give a few examples of Dylan’s DJ persona, for example, the second article quotes his segue after playing Muddy Waters’ Blow Wind, Blow:

‘Chicago is known as the Windy City, but it’s not the windiest city in the US; the windiest city is Dodge City, Kansas. Other windy cities are Amarillo, Texas; Rochester, Minneso-taaa … all of which beat Chicago.’

The one hour weekly show, dubbed The Theme Time Radio Hour, launches May 3rd at 10am EDT on XMradio ch. 40. The British musicologist Charlie Gillett adds, “It draws you in and you never for a moment think he’s playing games, which he’s supposedly notorious for doing.”

One surprising fact mentioned in the article is that the program will apparently be broadcast online to U.S. internet users, via XMradio Online (a service that is noticeably absent from Sirius). Trial passes are available here.

Expecting Rain provides a key to access a preview of the show. (First entry under April 23).

In celebration of my recently expanded bandwidth, Here’s a cut from a recent Dylan performance:

Air Force One Graffiti Stunt

Mega-rich clothing designer Marc Ecko pulled off the unbelievable staging of a two minute video in which what appears to be Air Force One is slathered with the spraypainted phrase “Still Free.” The phrase comes from Ecko’s latest video game, “Getting Up.”

AP via Wired:

President Bush’s jet looked so authentic that the Air Force wasn’t immediately certain whether the plane had been targeted.[…]

“I wanted to do something culturally significant, wanted to create a real pop-culture moment,” said Marc Ecko of Marc Ecko Enterprises. “It’s this completely irreverent, over-the-top thing that could really never happen: this five-dollar can of paint putting a pimple on this Goliath.”

Ecko later explained the stint here. The video was staged covertly using a rented 747 at a hangar at San Bernadino airport.

Click on image to watch video.

Blogosphemers

I always think articles like the one in today’s Wall Street Journal are a kind of jinx. Can Bloggers Make Money?

The old guard says no way, new guard says why not. Some interesting opinions to peruse, but overall, isn’t it a jinx to go about your business thinking only of the green potential?

Of more interest, the ever-optimistic web innovator and Technorati founder David Sifry has released Part One of this month’s State of the Blogosphere report. “The blogosphere is doubling in size every 6 months,” is just one of the findings in his research.

Possibly the most useful item floating through the Blogosphere this week (aside from, on a local level, the 225 things to do in L.A. meme – in celebration of the city’s 225th anniversary) is Buzz Machine’s Jeff Jarvis publishing this questionniare, given to any freelancer who intends to write for the New York Times.

Jarvis “suggest[s] that bloggers should answer the questions as well and post them online to pressure mainstream journalists into such open disclosure.”

He answers the questions on his disclosures page, and Vaughn Ververs at Public Eye responds, as does Regret the Error.

BlogBurst — Is it Live?

I would never go on and finish that cliche with the anachronistic “… or is it Memorex”, especially not on National Originality Day!

But, according to an article in Wired, BlogBurst launched last Tuesday. As one of 600 or so bloggers signed up for the project, I am curious as to how exactly and if my content is being seen by potential publishers, has been published, etc. There is still no way to read reports in the BlogBurst module, which is a bit frustrating (although I fully expect there to be nothing to report — especially with regards to THIS blog)!

Evidence of AT&T Secret ‘Spy’ Room Mounts

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) filed suit earlier this year against AT&T for their collaboration in invading privace by data-mining and providing wiretaps for the National Security Agency.

Last week, Wired broke the news of an affidavit filed by Mark Klein, a former AT&T employee. Klein describes a shady scenario in which the NSA came in to oversee a special hire.

“I learned that the person whom the NSA interviewed for the secret job was the person working to install equipment in this room,” Klein wrote. “The regular technician work force was not allowed in the room.”

He later observed that fiber optic cables wired to the “secret room” were piped into AT&T’s circuits.

While the president may or may not have the constitutional authority to demand domestic wiretaps, the involvement of a public corporation willingly cooperating without a warrant would seem to be a violation.

Michael Hiltzik writes in his L.A. Times weblog:

The NSA’s vacuuming of terabytes of personal data from AT&T’s network is an example of the government aggressively taking advantage of a tattered fabric of privacy protection.

Klein may seem a hero to some, for stepping forward with a smoking gun that has At&T scrambling to ask the judge to return all of their “highly classified” NSA-related documents. But as Martin McKeay reminds, Klein’s actions will be viewed by some as a criminal disclosure of government secrets.

Either way, this story has exploded with this new twist and is now receiving broad coverage.

Klein may be just a disgruntled former employee, but would he really take such a risk if he didn’t have the truth on his side?

Ars Technica has an in-depth look at the technology involved in this case and the Narus STA 6400, which apparently can literally vacuum data from the internet.