25 Mind Blowing Social Media Infographics

25 Mind Blowing Social Media Infographics

25 Mind Blowing Social Media Infographics

Posted by Michael Duvall in Social Media on Jan 7th, 2010 | 33 responses
Inforgraphics, “extensively [used] as tools by computer scientists, mathematicians, and statisticians” , have exploded onto the internet in the last few years. What’s so great about this aesthetic pieces of ‘data reinforced gems’, is their ability to paint a larger picture of what it is the creator is trying to express.

With the complexity and explosive growth of social media over the last few years, it’s not hard to see why so many have looked to express this information in a visually appealing manner – not to mention the benefits they provide when putting on a group presentation.

The following 25 social media infographics have been reduced in size to allow you to quickly scroll down the page. Each one has been linked to the original and it is highly encouraged that you visit the links to see them in their full size.

1. Profiles of a Twitter User

A_profile_of_a_twitter_user.jpg


2. Building a Company with Social Media

Social-Media-Building.gif

3. The World Map of Social Networks

The_World_Map_of_Social_Networks.jpg

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Bono Bloody Bono – Ten for the Next Ten – NYTimes.com

Intellectual Property Developers

Caution! The only thing protecting the movie and TV industries from the fate that has befallen music and indeed the newspaper business is the size of the files. The immutable laws of bandwidth tell us we’re just a few years away from being able to download an entire season of “24” in 24 seconds. Many will expect to get it free.

A decade’s worth of music file-sharing and swiping has made clear that the people it hurts are the creators — in this case, the young, fledgling songwriters who can’t live off ticket and T-shirt sales like the least sympathetic among us — and the people this reverse Robin Hooding benefits are rich service providers, whose swollen profits perfectly mirror the lost receipts of the music business.

We’re the post office, they tell us; who knows what’s in the brown-paper packages? But we know from America’s noble effort to stop child pornography, not to mention China’s ignoble effort to suppress online dissent, that it’s perfectly possible to track content. Perhaps movie moguls will succeed where musicians and their moguls have failed so far, and rally America to defend the most creative economy in the world, where music, film, TV and video games help to account for nearly 4 percent of gross domestic product. Note to self: Don’t get over-rewarded rock stars on this bully pulpit, or famous actors; find the next Cole Porter, if he/she hasn’t already left to write jingles.

Bono’s insinuation that content must be tagged, tracked, and protected in the interest of the creator is an uneven (if not borderline fascist) suggestion.

The biggest problem with this is that bandwidth regulation affects not just entertainment (whether downloaded, streamed, for pay or for free) but everything else that operates in the digital space.

Which includes education, charity, government, and most ironically, the development, production, and broadcast of creative content itself.

Read up on Net Neutrality Bono. The movie industry is booming (in spite of a relative abundance of poor content). But the service providers aren’t just stuffing their pockets with profit, they’re limiting both consumers and creators by throttling bandwidth.

Don’t wage war on the Internet, Bono. Talk about putting your back up against the wall… please don’t go singing that song.

Please comment at ADigitalAge.com

Posted via web from Welcome to the Digital Age

Open Government Directive Issued — Will it Be Followed?

The U.S. government is vowing to keep an open dialogue just as it seems it’s getting stuck back in it’s tight-lipped ways. Today the White House Open Government Initiative released the Open Government Directive (PDF) and the Open Government Progress Report to the American People (pdf).

Wordle: Open Government Dialogue#OGD Wordle via Clay Johnson.

OMB director Peter Orszag explains at WhiteHouse.gov:

The directive, sent to the head of every federal department and agency today, instructs the agencies to take specific actions to open their operations to the public. The three principles of transparency, participation, and collaboration are at the heart of this directive. Transparency promotes accountability. Participation allows members of the public to contribute ideas and expertise to government initiatives. Collaboration improves the effectiveness of government by encouraging partnerships and cooperation within the federal government, across levels of government, and between the government and private institutions.

The Sunlight Foundation has full coverage here and here.

Below, I’ve embedded both official documents for your perusal. To what levels are these directives enforceable? Who will be monitoring and how?
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